#Bee finds

Morning, morning!

Blimey, it’s going to be an absolute scorcher today, the sun ☀️ is already hot at 6am.

https://lydianeedlecom.files.wordpress.com/2018/06/img_5186.movYesterday, on twitter, the amazing Bee ‘knowledgeable-ones’ confirmed that these Bees, that I found on one of our many walks down to Sennen beach, was Megachile leachella, or the Silvery leafcutter. How chuffed was I?

It’s not rare but it was oh so special to me. I’m going to pop it on to iRecord today.

Have a lovely day everyone, and I hope you get to enjoy the sunshine 🌞 and shade.

Don’t forget to look at my posts from yesterday to see my #beenews.

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BEE NEWS: Bees on the road and new open called

Bee news number 1!

Well, rather beautifully and smoothly, the second leg exhibition is going on the road.

Hurrah!

So, where is it going?

Well, tomorrow Shaun the Angel myself head off to Swindon to the Richard Jefferies Museum to see Mike and Suzie and the team to collect all 107 pieces of art.

We’ll lovingly wrap them and pop them in the car and drive them back to somerset.

And then on Wednesday, we will be taking them to Donna in Langport at For Every Cloud, ready for the reopening of the exhibition in August.

Isn’t that brilliant – I am sooooo chuffed.

It will the same exhibition yet totally different because of the change of gallery.

I hope some of you get the change to come and see it.

And in bee news number 2, a new open call.

“What?” I hear you cry, “already?”

Well, yes, these Bee spectaculars don’t organise themselves, you know!

So, if you’d like to participate in the third part of this exciting Bee project , nows your time to shine.

We are looking for a wide variety of people from all spectrums of the Arts.

The deadline is the end of august so you’ve plenty of time but don’t leave it too late…..the number of times I’ve heard, “oh, I missed the deadline….!”

Well, notice given , you lovely lot – we want you!

https://goo.gl/forms/uRfNKaBINb3i0ueh1

And, how about sharing this post?

The curious incident of the Bee in the night.

On Friday night, I drew the curtains across in the kitchen and discovered a very tired Buff-tailed Bumblebee.

“Well,” I thought, “there’s no point in setting it free now, there’ll be no food”. So I made up sugar solution for its breakfast and let it sleep.

I got up at six to bright sunshine but a less bright Bee, poor thing, but administered said sugar solution.

The Bee was unresponsive, looked injured, her legs went from under her and she was not moving.

After a minute or two her body slowly vibrated a little and she (I thought accidentally) vibrated into the mini sugary puddle. It looked like she was taking her last breath – her antennae we moving so slowly.

But then, all of a sudden, and I mean SUDDENLY, she began moving – the sugar hit the spot. So I ran into the garden in me jimmys to grab some grape hyacinth and she lapped up the nectar in there. A moment later I popped her into the garden and she was gone.

Success and happiness – so, it works.

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#grapehyacinth #bumblebee #bufftailedbumblebee #sugarsolution #savethebees #bees #beerescue

OPENING TODAY – Bees: the interconnectedness of all things at Bruton School for Girls 

The girls worked so beautifully hard and enthusiastically to produce a fabulous collaborative installation.

Three days, 80 plus students and a handful of staff produced a whole host of British bees which are now hanging in the gallery at the Bruton School for Girls.


‘Taught by Lydia Needle, Bruton School for Girls students will sculpt tiny, lifesize British bees in wool, representing just a few of the 260 varieties left in theUK. 

The bees become artworks as part of a whole school installation in the school’s gallery. To follow up this work, the students will research the habitats and ecosystems, the flora and fauna that rely on bees, to create companion artworks. Our objective is to raise awareness of the diversity of bees in Britain and to spread the story – using art as a medium – as far as possible.’ SAW guide 2017. 

Bees will be flying off to new homes…..

By the end of day 2 of the FIFTY BEES exhibition, all of these creatures below had found new homes which they will be flying off to at the end of the exhibition.

Now, obviously, not everyone who wants to give a bee a home can get to the gallery.

Therefore, over the next few days I will start listing an occasional bee on my website.

BUT

And it’s a big BUTYou’ll need to purchase via the gallery.

tel:01458 20273008

Cat’s piece – the nomad bee

Second bee companion for sharing, this is by Cat Frampton and has to be seen to believed – the cirl buntings are so, so small but perfectly realised, and the Braille, well, it’s a challenge – can you rise to the challenge? 


It is companioned with Nomada sexfasciata.

This is what Cat says about her piece: 

‘The birds and the bees

My bee is a rare bee. A rare bee with a solitary, thieving life. It depends on another bee to steal from, that bee is also rare. These bees share a crook of land with a bird, a rare bird.

In 1989 the Cirl Bunting lived (in Britain) only at Prawle Point, Devon, 118 pairs, clinging on.

Then conservationists and local farmers stepped in and saved the birds (over 1000 nests now, all along the coast). Did saving the birds save the bees?

Farmers, rare birds and bees combine, for the good of them all.

Can you tell what the Braille says?’ 

Polly’s honey bee piece

As promised, I’m going to start sharing the work of the other artists in the FIFTY BEES exhibition. And I thought I should start with Polly Hughes as she has been working on the honey bee, the most well know of the bees. 


What I absolutely adore about this piece is Polly’s use of patchwork, a very traditional, often overlooked women’s craft, to make us look with fresh eyes on the dance of bee.


She writes: ‘This bee is not only a honey producer but also one of the most important insect pollinators of both crop plants and wild flowers. Today, as never before, the honey-bee faces the danger of careless spraying of insecticides and weedkillers on plants in bloom, as well as disease and adverse weather conditions. 

Bees communicate the finding of food by dancing on the vertical comb. The Waggle Dance is used when the food is more than 100 metres away from the hive. The dancing bee runs in one direction, waggling her body very quickly from side to side. She then turns round and runs in a semi-circle back to the starting point, repeating the performance again and again. The angle of the waggle tells both the sun-compass direction to fly, and how far. 

The silhouette footprints are a recreation of dance step guides. The beaded Waggle Dance is embroidered onto hexagonal patchwork cells.’

And this is my companion piece.