Here’s Fluff

She snuck off to find a cosy place to close her eyes and this is where we find her. 

This is Fluff and she’s sleeping soundly inside a vintage metal container and doesn’t she look peaceful; I wish I could sleep so easily and so soundly, don​’t you?

This piece is 7cm circumference and 6cm to the top of the handle. It is made using wool, a vintage container and thread.
https://tictail.com/s/lidfuzz/fluff-sleeping

Excited artist

Hello!

Excited artist back in the studio for the first time in weeks. 

And not only am excited about being creative again but also by new toy – Bluetooth headphones!!! This means I can move around easier with loud tunes on – not that I move around a huge amount when I’m making making but when I do move and the wire getting pulled out, cor you should hear me swear. So, these are an investment to curtail my habit of swearing – that’s my argument anyhooooo. Today’s favourite tunes are by Ghostpoet – brilliant.

Anyway, today I’m working on pieces for Salisbury Contemporary Craft which is on 8-9th September. 

Hope to share one tomorrow xx

After the day job, popping into the gallery.

Popped into ACEarts today after the day job – sat on the very comfy chairs and nearly fell asleep. Lovely to see so many people slowly moving round to gallery, quietly taking in the work. Sometimes there’s a lot of chatter and other times people are taking in the work in a more solitary way.

Great also the the Wool Carder Bee has a new home to go to at the end of the month – I’d love to share with you who has decide to home this one because i think it will make you smile but need to check with them first. .


Exhibition from 1st to 22nd July, open Tuesday to Saturday – 10-5pm

01458 273008

The Bilberry Bumblebee 

This is the Bilberry Bumblebee, paired with its companion piece by Helen Hickman of Nellie and Eve. 


This is what Helen says about her work.

“My creation is inspired by the landscape that Bombus Monticola (Bilberry Bumble Bee) and I live in.

Surrounded by species rich heath and peat bogs in the Welsh hills, Bilberry feeds on plants such as gorse, blackberry and of course, bilberries, which line banks.

As a spinner, weaver and dyer my material of choice is local wool, a much undervalued, sustainable fibre.

By carefully foraging for plants that produce rich, natural dyes for my hand spun yarns, crochet hexagons become ‘honeycomb’ inside a used ‘brood’ frame representing how it is possible to mindfully interact and interconnect with our natural environment.” 

Bees will be flying off to new homes…..

By the end of day 2 of the FIFTY BEES exhibition, all of these creatures below had found new homes which they will be flying off to at the end of the exhibition.

Now, obviously, not everyone who wants to give a bee a home can get to the gallery.

Therefore, over the next few days I will start listing an occasional bee on my website.

BUT

And it’s a big BUTYou’ll need to purchase via the gallery.

tel:01458 20273008

Bee gifts

On Friday night, at the private view, I had the absolute pleasure of meeting Louisa Crispin, an artist of extraordinary talents and a bee enthusiast. 

She has a piece hanging in the exhibition – this is not it, though. 

This is a tiny, beautiful drawing that she gave to me on the night and is one of the preparatory drawings about the Short-haired Bumblebee, her bee.

I was absolutely blown away – so chuffed, so honoured. Thank you so much, Louisa – can’t wait to put this on my wall – I know precisely where it’s going.The gallery is open today so if you’d like to see the piece Louisa did for the FIFTY BEES exhibition, call in between 10-5. 

Polly Hughes is on duty too so she’ll be there to talk about her work and many of the other wonderful pieces on display.

Cat’s piece – the nomad bee

Second bee companion for sharing, this is by Cat Frampton and has to be seen to believed – the cirl buntings are so, so small but perfectly realised, and the Braille, well, it’s a challenge – can you rise to the challenge? 


It is companioned with Nomada sexfasciata.

This is what Cat says about her piece: 

‘The birds and the bees

My bee is a rare bee. A rare bee with a solitary, thieving life. It depends on another bee to steal from, that bee is also rare. These bees share a crook of land with a bird, a rare bird.

In 1989 the Cirl Bunting lived (in Britain) only at Prawle Point, Devon, 118 pairs, clinging on.

Then conservationists and local farmers stepped in and saved the birds (over 1000 nests now, all along the coast). Did saving the birds save the bees?

Farmers, rare birds and bees combine, for the good of them all.

Can you tell what the Braille says?’