Excited artist

Hello!

Excited artist back in the studio for the first time in weeks. 

And not only am excited about being creative again but also by new toy – Bluetooth headphones!!! This means I can move around easier with loud tunes on – not that I move around a huge amount when I’m making making but when I do move and the wire getting pulled out, cor you should hear me swear. So, these are an investment to curtail my habit of swearing – that’s my argument anyhooooo. Today’s favourite tunes are by Ghostpoet – brilliant.

Anyway, today I’m working on pieces for Salisbury Contemporary Craft which is on 8-9th September. 

Hope to share one tomorrow xx

Bees will be flying off to new homes…..

By the end of day 2 of the FIFTY BEES exhibition, all of these creatures below had found new homes which they will be flying off to at the end of the exhibition.

Now, obviously, not everyone who wants to give a bee a home can get to the gallery.

Therefore, over the next few days I will start listing an occasional bee on my website.

BUT

And it’s a big BUTYou’ll need to purchase via the gallery.

tel:01458 20273008

Cat’s piece – the nomad bee

Second bee companion for sharing, this is by Cat Frampton and has to be seen to believed – the cirl buntings are so, so small but perfectly realised, and the Braille, well, it’s a challenge – can you rise to the challenge? 


It is companioned with Nomada sexfasciata.

This is what Cat says about her piece: 

‘The birds and the bees

My bee is a rare bee. A rare bee with a solitary, thieving life. It depends on another bee to steal from, that bee is also rare. These bees share a crook of land with a bird, a rare bird.

In 1989 the Cirl Bunting lived (in Britain) only at Prawle Point, Devon, 118 pairs, clinging on.

Then conservationists and local farmers stepped in and saved the birds (over 1000 nests now, all along the coast). Did saving the birds save the bees?

Farmers, rare birds and bees combine, for the good of them all.

Can you tell what the Braille says?’ 

Polly’s honey bee piece

As promised, I’m going to start sharing the work of the other artists in the FIFTY BEES exhibition. And I thought I should start with Polly Hughes as she has been working on the honey bee, the most well know of the bees. 


What I absolutely adore about this piece is Polly’s use of patchwork, a very traditional, often overlooked women’s craft, to make us look with fresh eyes on the dance of bee.


She writes: ‘This bee is not only a honey producer but also one of the most important insect pollinators of both crop plants and wild flowers. Today, as never before, the honey-bee faces the danger of careless spraying of insecticides and weedkillers on plants in bloom, as well as disease and adverse weather conditions. 

Bees communicate the finding of food by dancing on the vertical comb. The Waggle Dance is used when the food is more than 100 metres away from the hive. The dancing bee runs in one direction, waggling her body very quickly from side to side. She then turns round and runs in a semi-circle back to the starting point, repeating the performance again and again. The angle of the waggle tells both the sun-compass direction to fly, and how far. 

The silhouette footprints are a recreation of dance step guides. The beaded Waggle Dance is embroidered onto hexagonal patchwork cells.’

And this is my companion piece.

Bees up

I’ve been buzzing around at high speed, making work, organising and curating for months. 

Last nights private view #beesup was A M A Z I N G – around 250 people came. I am absolutely over the moon, blown away and flabbergasted.

Thanks to all at ACEarts and the team of beekeepers @mDonna Vale, Joy Merron and Polly Hughes for all of your hard work and to all of the artists and visitors. 

Today, I find myself exhausted so I’m going to have a little lie down and start sharing the works with you tomorrow. Xxx

The book of the bees

I’ve finally got a little book of the fifty bees in my grubby little paws and I’m so pleased.


It’s an A5 book published to coincided with the exhibition FIFTY BEES: The Interconnectedness of All Things. 
Fifty full colour pages of each of the fifty art pieces created for the exhibition by me, Lydia Needle. 

I’ve only got 25 copies printed so far but more should follow if they prove popular.

What do you think?



http://www.blackdogandgingercat.co.uk/product/fifty-bees-the-booklet-of-the-bees 

14% = sharing finished bee pieces to celebrate

Thanks everyone for the wonderful support, we’re up to 14%

So, I thought you might like to see a few finished bee pieces.

These are the five Nomadas that I’ve made for this FIFTY BEES project and they are nomada armata, nomada conjungens, nomada fulvicoris, nomada roberjeotians and nomada sexfasciata.

Look them up and find out about their lives and ecosystems – you might discover something quite surprising ….!

http://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/fifty-bees-the-interconnectedness-of-all-things/

nomada finished small